COM Connection

Modern type alternators have a COM connection. Below you will find more information about these connections and the protocols.

What is COM? COM stands for Communication or Computer and is a digital communication signal, referred also in bytes.

Functions:

  • These connections are developed to save fuel

  • These connections use a digital signal, one faster than the other

  • The faster the alternator reacts to the car computers commands, the faster fuel will be saved

  • The communication speed is called Baud Rate

COM-CONNECTION

Bauderate  2400kb

LIN-1.3  9600KB

BSS-1

LIN-2.1  19200KB

BSS-2

LIN-1

BSS-3

LIN-2

 

LIN-3

 

LIN-4

 

LIN-5

 

LIN-6

 

LIN-7

 

LIN-8

 

LIN-9

 

LIN-10

 

LIN-11

 

LIN-12

 

LIN-13

 

LIN-14

 

LIN-15

 

LIN-16

 

LIN-17

 

LIN-18

 

LIN-19

 

LIN-20

 

LIN-21

 

LIN-22

 

LIN-23

 

Transfer rate of a serial connection, the amount of bits per second over a serial channel can be sent. A measurement of the speed at which a modem transmits data. Often confused with bps (the number of bits per second that is sent), the baud-rate measurement is in fact the number of events, or signal changes, that occur in one second. An event in digital communication with the high speed in fact can encode more than one bit, and baud rate is not necessarily synonymous bps, the last one is a more accurate unit which is applicable to modems. A 9600-baud modem for example, that 4 bits per event encodes actually works with 2400 baud, but transmits at 9600 bps (2400 event times 4 bits per event) and would be named a 9600 bps modem.